Preschoolers

Tracking Your Child: Paranoia or Smart?

Some say our society has collectively become too paranoid. Gone are the days when we send our kids out to play in the neighborhood, not knowing their exact whereabouts but relying on the comforting knowledge that they’ll return safely to us when the street lights came on.

Five ways to reduce accidents

Bicycling is a great way for children and their parents to get exercise, but it's important to follow a few safety rules. Both children and adults should wear a properly fitted bicycle helmet and ride a bike that is the right size, has functioning brakes, and fully inflated tires, according to National Highway and Traffic Safety Administration. The
NHTSA also recommends that children younger than 10 years old ride on
the side walk.
Parents riding with their children in the street should follow the rules of the road and use bright colored clothing or gear to make yourself more visible to drivers.

The Storybook Shoppe opens its doors in Bluffton

The boxes are unpacked and the paint is dry, which means The Storybook Shoppe is set to open its doors on Wednesday.

Have children, must find playgroup

Not outgoing enough to playgroup pick-up? 
Don't worry. Lowcountry Child has you covered.

For local playgroups, click here.

Being a new mom is a daunting job. During those first couple of months, you’re preoccupied with how to feed and how to get this little baby to sleep while trying to fit in shut-eye for yourself. But after a while, when you settle into the role of motherhood, you begin to crave the company of other moms.
Before having my son, Cole, I went to work and interacted with 10 to 20 people every day. Once I became a mom, all of that changed. I suddenly found myself cooped up in the house, just me and this little thing that cried and spit up all the time (and I mean all the time). After a while, I was desperately seeking some social interaction. But where do you turn?

Backpack safety

Chiropractors, pediatricians and orthopedic surgeons alike agree that backpacks are a problem for your child’s spine. While they may not cause major problems, overloading and improper carrying of a backpack can lead to neck and shoulder pain as well as lower back pain.

Prevent eye injuries

"You'll poke your eye out!" Remember that saying just when the fun was about to begin?

Well, it turns out that's pretty good advice. Preventable trauma is the leading cause of blindness in teenagers and older children. Dr. Richard Akers of Atlantic Ophthalmology in Beaufort offers some rules of the road:

First-time school jitters (and how to cope!)

Experts say separation anxiety sets in before babies are a year old. Those experts clearly haven’t been at a bus stop with a kindergartner and her parents on the first day of school.

Starting school can elicit excitement and anxiety for both parent and child. Here are a few things you can do to make sure everyone survives the first-day jitters.

Healthy After School Snacks

There are tons of prepackaged snacks out there for kids (just turn on the TV in the mid-afternoon and you’re sure to be inundated with commercials for them), but rarely are they actually nutritious.

Toddler activities in the kitchen

There's one room in the house that consistently mystifies and amazes small children. The kitchen. To these knee-high toddlers, there are drawers and cabinets that open and shut, shiny bowls and utensils, running water and sometimes steam emanating from the stove-top. It's also a place where toddlers can have the most ... fun (you thought I'd say 'dangerous,' didn't you?). Here are some easy activities from “The Toddler's Busy Book” by Trish Kuffner that can calm a crazed child using items you probably already have:

Reading and Story time Programs

Finding ways to beat the heat and keep your kids entertained can be tough. Lowcountry Child staffers compiled this list of story times, reading and other educational programs to help!